15 March 2010

UPCOMING: Patrick Glenn's Legal traditions of the world (4th edition)

Patrick Glenn's Legal traditions of the world: sustainable diversity in law (Oxford University Press, 4th edition) is due to be released in May 2010.

This prize-winning work offers a major new means of conceptualizing law and legal relations across the world. National laws are placed in the broader context of major legal traditions, those of chthonic (or indigenous) law, talmudic law, civil law, islamic law, common law, hindu law and confucian law. Each tradition is examined in terms of its institutions and substantive law, its founding concepts and methods, its attitude towards the concept of change and its teaching on relations with other traditions and peoples. Legal traditions are explained in terms of multivalent and non-conflictual forms of logic and thought.

This book will be invaluable to law students and lawyers engaged in comparative or transnational work, historians, social scientists, and all those interested in the legal traditions that underpin the world's major societies. Features:
  • Winner of the Grand Prize of the International Academy of Comparative Law
  • Provides an overview of major legal institutions and principles in each tradition facilitating understanding of law in a broader context
  • Provides a comprehensive treatment of major legal traditions of the world and incorporates a superb level of scholarship and analysis
  • dopts a genuinely global perspective making it an invaluable resource for courses worldwide
  • Includes extensive references and web links at the end of each chapter, to aid and encourage further research
  • A seminal text from a leading teacher and researcher in the field of comparative law. Professor Glenn is a former Director of the Institute of Comparative Law, McGill University, a member of the International Academy of Comparative Law, and has been a Visiting Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford
  • Includes a thoroughly revised and restructured chapter on confucian legal traditions
  • Features interesting discussion of how legal traditions relate to parallel notions of collective memory, places of memory, and deep history
  • Considers developments in the legal systems of the European Union, in the context of each relevant legal tradition

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