03 March 2013

BOOKS: New Titles from Hart Publishing


The following are a few of the new titles recently published by Hart:
  • Managing Family Justice in Diverse Societies - Edited by Mavis Maclean and John Eekelaar
  • Comparative Company Law: A Case-Based Approach - Edited by Mathias Siems and David Cabrelli
  • Organised Crime and the Law: A Comparative Analysis - Liz Campbell
  • European Competition Law Annual 2010: Merger Control in European and Global Perspective - Edited by Philip Lowe and Mel Marquis


See below for additional information.


Managing Family Justice in DiverseSocieties - Edited by Mavis Maclean and John Eekelaar

The aim of this book is to explore what response the law has or should have to different family practices arising from cultural and religious beliefs. The issue has become increasingly debated as western countries have become more culturally diverse. Although discussion has frequently focused on the role Islamic family law should have in these countries, this book seeks to set that discussion within a wider context that includes consideration both of theoretical issues and also of empirical data about the interaction between specific family practices and state law in a variety of jurisdictions ranging from England and Wales to Bangladesh, Botswana, Spain, Poland, France, Israel, Iran and South Africa. The contributors to the 17 chapters approach the subject matter from a variety of perspectives, illustrating its complex and often sensitive nature. The book does not set out to propose any single definitive strategy that should be adopted, but provides material on which researchers, advocates and policy makers can draw in furthering their understanding of and seeking solutions to the problems raised by this significant social development.

Comparative Company Law: A Case-Based Approach - Edited by Mathias Siems and David Cabrelli

As attention moves rapidly towards comparative approaches, the research and teaching of company law has somehow lagged behind. The overall purpose of this book is therefore to fill a gap in the literature by identifying whether conceptual differences between countries exist. Rather than concentrate on whether the institutional structure of the corporation varies across jurisdictions, the objective of this book will be pursued by focusing on specific cases and how different countries might treat each of these cases. The book also has a public policy dimension, because the existence or absence of differences may lead to the question of whether formal harmonisation of company law is necessary.

The book covers 10 legal systems. With respect to countries of the European Union, it focuses on the most populous countries (Germany, France, the UK, Spain, Italy and Poland) as well as two smaller Member States (Finland and Latvia). In addition, the laws of two of the world's largest economies (the US and Japan) are included for the purposes of wider comparison. All of these jurisdictions are subjected to scrutiny by deploying a comparative case-based study. On the basis of these case solutions, various conclusions are reached, some of which challenge established orthodoxies in the field of comparative company law.


Organised Crime and the Law presents an overview of the laws and policies adopted to address the phenomenon of organised crime in the United Kingdom and Ireland, assessing the changes to these justice systems, in terms of the prevention, investigation, prosecution and punishment of such criminality. While the notion of organised crime is a contested one, States’ legal responses treat it and its constituent offences as unproblematic in a definitional sense. This book advances a systematic doctrinal critique of these domestic criminal laws,laws of evidence and civil processes.
Organised Crime and the Law focuses on the tension between due process and crime control, the demands of public protection and risk aversion, and other adaptations. In particular, it identifies parallels and points of divergence between the different jurisdictions in the UK and Ireland, bearing in mind the shared history of subversive threats and counter-terrorism policies. It also examines the extent to which policy transfer is evident in the UK and Ireland in terms of emulating the United States in reacting to organised crime.


Every year, top-level market regulators, academics and legal and economic practitioners contribute to the Annual Competition Workshop organised at the European University Institute in Florence. The Co-Directors of the Workshop are Philip Lowe, Mel Marquis and Giorgio Monti.

Workshop participants address and critically analyse a particular set of topical issues in the field of competition law and policy. The proceedings are published in Hart's European Competition Law Annual series.

This is the fifteenth in the ECLA series. It encompasses numerous chapters that examine the field of merger control from a variety of perspectives. In these chapters the contributors discuss legal and economic issues of substantive analysis, procedure, comity and best practices, as well as matters relating to the litigation of merger cases, particularly before the European Courts. The discussion also benefits from the perspectives of policy makers and experts from Canada, China, Japan, Korea, the United States and other jurisdictions and regions.

Contributors to the book include; John Boyce, Rachel Brandenburger, Jochen Burrichter, Maher Dabbah, Thomas Deisenhofer, Götz Drauz, Kirsten Edwards, Adam Fanaki, Calvin Goldman, Klaus Gugler, Barry Hawk, Scott Hemphill, Seonghoon Jeon, William Kovacic, Mel Marquis, Abel Mateus, Andreas Mundt, Lars-Hendrik Röller, Tadashi Shiraishi, Irwin Stelzer, James Venit, Sven Völcker, Vanessa Yanhua Zhang, Xinzhu Zhang

No comments:

Recent Posts